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Creative web development

PHP: Registration and confirmation email system part 1

If you’ve ever tried to register on a web site to use a forum or download the trial version of a product, you may have come across a registration system that emails you a message that you have to respond to before your login or account is activated. Today we’re going to start taking a look at how we can go about creating such a system. We’ll build the interface in Dreamweaver, but by the very nature of what we’ll be doing we will also need to spend some time in the Code View. This article is divided into three parts. The contents of both articles are;

    1. Enter your details in a web form
    2. Submit the form to the web site
    3. Wait for confirmation email
    4. follow instructions in confirmation email, usually a link to click
    5. Log in to site with confirmed login and password

Please note that this article forms part of a chapter in the DMXzone e-book PHP Web Applications for Dreamweaver: Juicy Solutions for the Busy Developer.

    Author: Allan Kent Price: $3.59 Rating:

    PHP - Back to Basics part 1

    After a number of requests, in this series we’re going to back to basics and will look at PHP from a beginner’s point of view. If you’re looking to expand your knowledge of PHP, and want to move beyond what the default server behaviors etc that Dreamweaver MX offers, to create more advanced sites, then this is the series for you, so that you can get to grips with PHP and really understand what's happening when you begin to handcode and add more powerful features to your web pages.

    First, were going to look at how PHP actually works, and how the PHP code is processed on the web server, and how the web server knows which sections of the page represent PHP code. We then move on to look at the order in which certain PHP operations should be placed on the page, so that they can be processed in a logical order.

    In the second half of this tutorial we look at how to create simple output using PHP, and setup variables which can be used to hold values which change during the course of the script. We then look at a range of different operators which can be used to work with the values in variables, ready for the next part of this tutorial where we will be looking at conditional processing.

    Author: Gareth Downes-Powell Price: $3.59 Rating:

    PHP/ CSS Advanced Image Gallery part 4

    In last week's article we added some functionality to our admin page and altered the main gallery page so that users of your site could search for images and then click through to view a full-size image.  In this weeks article we will add some cool functionality to our gallery so that when a user clicks on a thumbnail to a full-size image, they can navigate through all the other images without having return to the main thumbnail gallery.

    A few loose ends are tidied up, and the result is a fully-functional image gallery using PHP and CSS - no tables - with all the code attached for download.

     

    Please note that this article forms part of a chapter in the DMXzone e-book PHP Web Applications for Dreamweaver: Juicy Solutions for the Busy Developer.

    Author: Allan Kent Price: $3.59 Rating: Not enough votes

    PHP/ CSS Image Gallery part 3

    In last week's article, " Thumbnailing a Portion of an Image ", we took a look at how we could alter our image gallery to provide an interactive way of creating a thumbnail from our uploaded image. In this week's tutorial we will do two things: first we will alter our gallery admin page so that we can see at a glance whether an uploaded image has a thumbnail or not and provide a link from the admin page to create or recreate thumbnails, and then we will revisit the main gallery page again and alter it to display the thumbnails of the images with click-throughs to the larger images that the thumbnail represents.

    It helps if you've read the previous article in this series, and hoping that you have read "PHP/ CSS Searchable Image Gallery" as well - but it's not compulsory, as all the code is provided.

     

    Please note that this article forms part of a chapter in the DMXzone e-book PHP Web Applications for Dreamweaver: Juicy Solutions for the Busy Developer.

    Note: Check also the DMXzone own CSS Image Gallery extension for amazing pure CSS galleries and slideshows with a fluent navigation and image transitions! 

    Author: Allan Kent Price: $3.59 Rating: Not enough votes

    PHP Custom Web Statistics – Part 4: graphing the statistics

    In the final part of this article on creating custom web statistics using PHP and MySQL, we're going improve on the display of our custom web statistics by adding some graphs, which give an easy to read display showing the best and worst months of the year, or days of the month for example.

     

    In this tutorial, we'll first give a brief overview of the GD image library, and how to check whether it’s installed, as well as how to install the library if its not already part of your PHP installation. Then we'll look the PHP image functions that are necessary to perform the various drawing operations used to create the dynamic graphs. Finally, we'll adapt the month.php and year.php pages to display custom graphs of the relevant hit data.

     

    Please note that this article forms part of a chapter in the DMXzone e-book PHP Web Applications for Dreamweaver: Juicy Solutions for the Busy Developer.

    Author: Gareth Downes-Powell Price: $3.59 Rating: Not enough votes

    PHP/ CSS Image Gallery: Thumbnailing a Portion of an Image

    In last week's article ("PHP/ CSS Searchable Image Gallery") we looked at how we could build an image gallery using PHP and MySQL and then display it with minimal effort by positioning the images on the page with CSS. Today we build an admin tool that allows you to define thumbnail images which we will link to the main image, but rather than blindly resize the thumbnail to within a set of specific size constraints, we will interactively provide you with a way of selecting a portion of the image to use as the thumbnail.

    So, using this code you can interactively choose which area of a photo to use as a thumbnail, looking far more professional than presenting a tiny hard-to-see thumbnail of the whole picture. As an example, here are two seperate areas being selected as thumbnails, using the script provided and explained in this week's tutorial.

     

    Please note that this article forms part of a chapter in the DMXzone e-book PHP Web Applications for Dreamweaver: Juicy Solutions for the Busy Developer.

    Author: Allan Kent Price: $3.59 Rating:

    PHP/ CSS Searchable Image Gallery

    This tutorial teaches you how to build a dynamically generated Photo gallery. The database stores keywords against each photograph, and then user can search on those keywords and the resulting images are dusplayed, using PHP to query the database and CSS to present the page, and so avoiding tables and fixed numbers of columns.A basic admin system is also built up for you to put images into a database on your server.

    This tutorial is suitable for intermediate-level Dreamweaver users, although no previous PHP knowledge is necessary.

     

    Please note that this article forms part of a chapter in the DMXzone e-book PHP Web Applications for Dreamweaver: Juicy Solutions for the Busy Developer.

    Author: Allan Kent Price: $3.59 Rating:

    PHP Custom Web Statistics Part 3

    In today's tutorial, Gareth provides and walks through the the code  to collect and display of your site's visitor statistics. We examine ways to select data in MySQL and display different types of hits in PHP. You learn how to identify different browsers, opeating systems, and whether the visitor is a "bot" or not ( robot from a search engine or other web crawler) and, if so, how to identify its origin, in order to display statistics to help you understand who visits your site.

    Please note that this article forms part of a chapter in the DMXzone e-book PHP Web Applications for Dreamweaver: Juicy Solutions for the Busy Developer.

    Author: Gareth Downes-Powell Price: $3.59 Rating: Not enough votes

    PHP: External Debugging With Sockets

    Usually, when debugging a PHP script, the easiest method is using echo statements to write variables to the screen to trace the progress of the program. But imagine you're trying to debug a PHP script that produces an image, Flash file, PDF or some other multimedia; dumping to the screen will break the content that the script is trying to produce!

    This tutorial provides a solution that uses sockets to connect to a port on our  machine or another machine, and write debug information out to that. This way we can have the output of our script displayed correctly or incorrectly as the case may be in our web browser, and the information about the variables in the script sent as output somewhere else.

    Code is provided for Windows, Mac OS9, OSX, Linux and the RealBasic source.

    Author: Allan Kent Price: $3.59 Rating:

    PHP Graphing: 3D-Effect Pie Charts

    This is the final article in the series on using PHP libraries to produce graphs on-the-fly from dynamic data. We've generated line graphs, bar graphs, pie charts, then coloured the pie charts and exploded them. This final tutorial shows how to produce 3D-style pie charts that can't enhance your sales figures - but can at least make the presentation of them look nicer!

    All the code is supplied for you to download, adapt - or just import straight into your PHP pages so you can up and running straight away!

     

    Author: Allan Kent Price: $3.59 Rating:

    PHP Graphing: Pie Charts Coloured and Exploded

    In the continuing series of dynamically drawing graphs with the PHP image functions, this week we revisit our pie graph and look at how to fill it with colour, and then how to give them an "exploded" look.  As in most things with programming, there is more than one way to skin a cat, so we'll also take a look an alternate method of drawing the wedges of our pie chart.

    It'll look much like this:

    Author: Allan Kent Price: $3.59 Rating:

    PHP Graphing – Pie Charts

    We've built up a bar chart script, and now we draw a pie chart.

    Drawing a pie chart is more complex than drawing a bar chart.  We will need to create a script that takes the data from the data holding class and convert it into proportional amounts.  With line and bar charts we were simply plotting a value along the vertical axis and the series along the horizontal axis, but with a pie chart, all of the data is represented in a circle.  This means that we will need to work out proportionately how much each of our plot values will take up of the 360° that makes up a full circle.  Once we have worked out the proportional amounts, we will then have to use some maths to determine where and how to draw the wedges of the circle that will represent the data. 
    Author: Allan Kent Price: $3.59 Rating: