Mozilla Gets On The Web Components Bandwagon With Brick

Web Components will change how you build web apps in the near future. At its core, web components let developers create reusable custom HTML tags (think: <datepicker>) for user interface patterns. Building them isn’t trivial, but all it takes is some knowledge of HTML, CSS and JavaScript to get going (though knowing something about what “Shadow DOM” is all about surely helps, too). The Web Components standardization process is still far from finished, but that isn’t stopping Google and Mozilla from putting their efforts behind it.

Google Launches Chrome 29

Right in line with its usual update cycle, Google released version 29 of its Chrome browser for Mac, Windows, Linux and Chrome Frame. There are no real surprises here, but just like most updates to the stable channel, Chrome 29 does introduce some smaller updates. On the desktop, this means the Omnibox — Chrome’s combined URL and search bar — now also bases its suggestions on the recency of the sites you have visited.

YouTube For Android Gets Major Makeover

Google started rolling out a major new version of YouTube for Android. This update is one of the most significant for the service in a long time and introduces a cool in-app multitasking feature that lets you minimize the screen while you browse channels or perform searches. It also features Google’s standard “card” interface. Until now, viewers had to stop the video. In this new version, the video will just move to the bottom-right corner of the screen and continue playing. From there, you can always get back to full-screen mode or just swipe right or left to dismiss the video.

GitHub Adds Trending Page That Can be Filtered

GitHub has launched a way to see what is trending across its service, making it easier to filter by time period, trending projects, developers and programming languages. Eight times a day, the new GitHub Trending Page calculates trending data by day, week and month. With its new filter, users can change the time period to the one they wish to explore.

Firefox 23 Launches With Built-in Share Button

Mozilla launched Firefox 23, which adds a couple of interesting features that extend the browser’s capabilities beyond just displaying websites. On the desktop, Firefox recently added the ability to integrate a number of social sites like Facebook, Cliqz and Mixi or new sites like msnNOW into a persistent sidebar in the browser. Now it is expanding this feature by adding a share button to the browser toolbar, too.

Opera Proposes NEX Packaging Format For Browser Extensions

Opera detailed a proposal for NEX, the Navigator Extension format, a new vendor-neutral browser extension packaging format that it hopes to turn into a future W3C standard for packaging cross-browser, add-on development. Currently, Chromium-based browsers use Google’s CRX format for delivering browser extensions. Opera, which recently switched to Chromium, says it developed NEX to “find a solution that would allow us to extend the Chromium CRX feature set without compromising the current ecosystem that has grown up around that format.”

Bootstrap 3 Goes Mobile-First

The team behind Bootstrap, the immensely popular grid-based, front-end framework for web development, launched the first release candidate of Bootstrap 3 includes over the weekend. Besides a tweaked look and a couple of new features (and also the removal of a few others), the most important change in this update is that Bootstrap, just like its close competitor Foundation, is now mobile first and responsive by default. The announcement coincided with new data from source-code search engine meanpath, which also this weekend announced that 1 percent of the 150 million websites in its index now use Bootstrap.

Yahoo IDs Officially Up for Grabs

Yahoo on Monday officially opened a request site for inactive usernames, so people can start claiming any IDs that have been inactive for more than a year. The company said last month that it was doing some more cleaning on its site by closing inactive accounts. In order to save IDs from extinction, users simply had to log in before Monday.

Animated WebP Graphics Support no Shoo-in for Chrome

Google introduced WebP in an attempt to speed up the Web, but now the company's engineers are raising concerns that one of the graphics format's features will actually slow it down. WebP is designed to compress graphics more efficiently than JPEG, GIF, and PNG. Shrinking file sizes more means data arrives faster, though there can be a penalty of longer times to encode and decode image files. One of WebP's newer features is support for animation - a package of multiple images shown in sequence to display a short movie.

Yahoo Acquires Bignoggins

Yahoo has announced that they’ve acquired Bignoggins Productions, a one-man iPhone development shop which had previously built a handful of fairly popular Fantasy Sports mobile apps. Up until today, Bignoggins had at least two apps in the store: Fantasy Monster ($5), and Draft Monster ($3). Both apps were built as all-in-one tools, meant to let Fantasy Sports nuts manage their pretend football/baseball/basketball/hockey teams across Yahoo, ESPN, and NFL’s competing services.

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