Microsoft quietly drops bitcoin support

Microsoft has quietly stopped supporting bitcoin payments just over one year after it added support for the crypto currency within the Windows Store. Software encyclopedia Softpedia first noticed the change, which is confirmed in an FAQ note for customers: "You can no longer redeem Bitcoin into your Microsoft account. Existing balances in your account will still be available for purchases from Microsoft Store, but can’t be refunded."

Opera adds a built-in ad blocker

There has been a lot of talk about mobile ad blocking lately, but on the desktop, this is an old phenomenon. Until now, however, desktop ad blocking was all about plugins. But Opera is about to change this and the latest developer release of the company’s desktop browser now includes a built-in ad blocker.

Google joins the Open Compute Project

Google today announced that it is joining the Open Compute Project (OCP), a five-year-old project founded by Facebook and a number of other companies that aims to drive IT infrastructure development forward through open source hardware. For Facebook, for example, this has meant open sourcing how it builds some of its servers and other data center hardware.

Adobe Launches Animate CC and Improved Muse

Adobe today officially launched Animate CC, the latest version of its animation tool for the web. Animate CC was previously known as Flash Professional, but the importance of Flash has (thankfully) declined over the last few years and the company decided it was time to rename the product to better represent what it is actually being used for. Animate CC, as well as an update to the Muse CC web design tool, is now available to all Creative Cloud subscribers.

Google reportedly paid Apple $1B

How important is it to Google to be the first place iPhone users go to for search results? Important enough that the Web giant reportedly pays its biggest rival in mobile big bucks for the privilege. The search giant paid Apple $1 billion in 2014 to keep its search bar on iOS devices, according to a Bloomberg examination of a court transcript from Oracle's long-running copyright lawsuit against Google. The payout was part of a revenue-sharing agreement between the two companies that gives Apple a percentage of the revenue Google generates through Apple devices, an attorney for Oracle said during a hearing last week in federal court.

Return of the 4-inch iPhone?

The Cupertino, California, electronics giant might be working on such a phone for a March unveiling, according to a report Friday from tech blog 9to5Mac, which has built a reputation for reliably breaking Apple news. The model could be called the iPhone 5SE.

Firefox ban on SHA-1 dropped

Mozilla has temporarily reinstated support for a vulnerable cryptographic algorithm after some Firefox users were unable to access encrypted HTTPS websites. The browser maker blamed the unintended consequence of deprecating support for SHA-1 certificates on man-in-the-middle devices, such as security scanners and anti-virus products.

Microsoft is pulling the plug on IE 8, 9, and 10

Microsoft is ending support for Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 next week on January 12th, releasing a final patch encouraging users to upgrade to one of the company's more recent browsers. The end of support means that these older versions of Internet Explorer will no longer receive security updates or technical support, making anyone who uses them much more vulnerable to hackers. A recently-announced patch will deliver the last few bug fixes, as well as an "End of Life" notification telling users to upgrade to IE 11 or Microsoft Edge — the company's successor to Internet Explorer, built for Windows 10.

Windows 10 universal apps plan gets a lift from Uber

Uber on Wednesday took to Microsoft's Windows blog to announce its universal Windows 10 which can run on phones, tablets and PCs. Uber product team member Yuixin Zhu credited the "power of the Universal Windows Platform" for the company's ability to do what Microsoft hopes what more developers will do: "deploy a single app through a unified store that delivers the right experience to whatever device downloads the app".

Mozilla kills off Suggested Tiles ads

After being birthed in September, Mozilla's Suggested Tiles feature that showed users advertised destinations when opening a new tab has not yet seen its first Christmas, but its usage is already winding down.

Mozilla vice president of Content Services Darren Herman said in a blog post that the browser maker would be ending advertising through its Tiles experiment, and would see out its current commitments as the feature is killed off over the next few months.

Newer articles Older articles